Be creative with embroidery designs!

transform a quilt block design into a gorgeous shirt design

Be creative with your machine embroidery designs! The quilt block embroidery design is from Anita Goodesign All Access May 2019 issue. I love the design, but I didn’t want to make a quilt block, although it is a very pretty quilt block – and the other embroidery designs in the collection. I had to think a little bit about it and get really creative.

Now, I am not telling you to change embroidery designs or edit them in any way, BUT you can get creative with what you have. I do not resize the quilt block embroidery design, but I remove some parts and group the rest of the objects so I can play around with the center design.

PLEASE NOTE: even though I edited and took apart the original embroidery design, it still belongs to Anita Goodesign – it is still their design. If you make changes to embroidery designs, it doesn’t mean that you can own that design – it is still the property of the original digitizer. Ok, whew, I just wanted to make that clear and make sure that no one gets any funny ideas. LOL. It’s kind of important to make that clear.

Also it should be made clear that you should not resize stitch file designs at all. You can really make a mess of it, and your embroidery machine will not be happy!! Remember the saying (say it with me now) STITCH FILES ARE FOR STITCHING. Yep, you got it!

I remove some of the parts, group and arrange some other parts and end up creating a design that is perfect for my shirt.

For more details on how I created this gorgeous shirt design for ME (I had to have something cool to wear to the Anita Goodesign Garage Sale next week), wait for the video that will be released tomorrow. The video will show you how I set up the designs and put them together to make a new (ish) design.

The next video, I will show you how to place the design and mark them with the little snowman dudes for perfect placement. I will also record the stitch out.

Be creative – remember the sky’s the limit! Start off with professional digitized designs and get the best embroidery results!

Until tomorrow!

Sue Brown

OML Embroidery/OML Embroidery University

Embird: Stitch files vs. EOF files

Hey everyone!  Hope your digitizing is going well and you are having lots of fun learning Embird and playing with the program!

I just wanted to post a quick reminder about the difference between stitch files and EOF files, so everyone can have nice stitch outs and avoid any digitizing hassles.

Stitch files:  OK, i could copy and paste a nice definition of what exactly a stitch file is, but I think putting it in normal words would be better.  A stitch file is the “final” stitch file that you can use to send to your machine.  Your machine will only understand one basic stitch file – for example .PES.   I called the stitch file “final” because it is basically in the format to send to your machine – the right size, the right colors etc.  You can make some small changes to the stitch file in Editor AND studio, but only small changes – for example, you can make a 10% size enlargement and have no issues with density or stitch coverage.

OK, so one of the major misconceptions is that if you take a stitch file and use the drop down list that says “edit stitch file in studio” and make some edits in studio and save over it as an EOF file, that makes it an EOF file, so you can edit it like you would a native EOF file.

NO.

The stitch file is ALWAYS A STITCH FILE, no matter where you edit it.  Just because you bring it into Studio, or even call it an EOF file, it is still a stitch file.   The only  fully editable files are native EOF files – the ones you created from scratch in Studio.  So even if you bring the PES file into studio, it is still a stitch file, and all Editor Stitch file rules still apply.

Hope that  helps everyone understand what you can and cannot do with a stitch file and the difference between a true EOF file and a stitch file in Studio.

HAPPY DIGITIZING.

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