Tag Archives: embroidery

6 Common Machine Embroidery HOOPING Mistakes

The 6 Common Embroidery Hooping Mistakes that change the outcome of your embroidery work. True Story. Read on, fellow embroiderers.

Hooping Skills:  the most important skill to learn in embroidery.

I have said it before, and I will keep saying it:  YOU ARE ONLY AS GOOD AS YOUR HOOPING SKILLS.

I know, I know.  I am such a nag, right?  Nah, not really.  I just want to get everyone to see that there is in fact, a right way and a wrong way when you are hooping.  How do I know this?  Years and years of experience, thousands of embroidery designs stitched on just about every fabric/item you can think of,  more learning, and tons of time figuring it all out.  So why not take advantage of what I know, and then you know how to do it right?  Why not set yourself apart from everyone else who does embroidery? You can do better, I just know it.

You are only as good as your hooping skills:  It makes sense, doesn’t it?  You can have the most beautiful embroidery design on the screen, and when you stitch it out, it looks terrible.  Why?  Hooping skills, that’s why!  If you don’t hoop something properly, it is not going to stitch properly.  If you don’t use the right size hoop, you may have mistakes.  If you don’t use the right kind of stabilizer, you will have issues.  Everything comes back to proper hooping skills.

Learn them, and learn them well.

Here are the 6 biggest mistakes in embroidery today.

  1. Using the wrong sized hoop for the job:

I see this time and time again – using the wrong sized hoop!  If you have a small design, you do not want to use a 5×7 hoop for that design – you want the smallest hoop that will fit your design.  You can figure this out in your software, or even on some machines.  My small single needle machine has some icons that tell you what sized hoop that you should be using.  Actually, it doesn’t tell you the right size, it shows you the size that your design will fit on.  It shows you the smallest size to the biggest size that is available.  Yes, the machine will stitch a 2×3 design on a 6×10 hoop, but that is not what you should be doing.   The smallest sized hoop for the design will ensure the proper stabilization and tension of the fabric and stabilizer when you hoop – and it will be easier to maintain that support when the design is embroidering.  If you use a bigger hoop, there is a bigger chance that the material will slip during embroidery.  Even if it slips a tiny bit, 1mm, that means that the part of your design that is stitching will be 1mm out.  Ok, that might not be too much, but it is quite possible that it may happen a few times- and then you will be out of registration on your design.  And that looks bad.

  • Floating stabilizer instead of hooping it.

I am pretty sure we have gone over this one before.  Let’s all say it together. Ready?  Float a boat, not stabilizer.  Or fabric.  Or anything.  Floating is for boats, not embroidery.   If you want sub-par or OK, results, keep floating.  If you want professional level, better-than-OK embroidery that you can be proud of, learn how to hoop properly.

  • Not hooping the fabric or garment:

See above.  Say it all over again, one more time.  You need to hoop stabilizer AND fabric at the same time.  Basting and (gasp) pins are NOT the same thing as hooping.  Basting stitches may generally hold your fabric in place, but it is not hooped and does not have the same consistent final results.   You may think it is good enough, but in reality, it just isn’t.  There is nothing that can take the place of hooping.  So hoop everything, please.

This embroidery design is using the proper hoop size for the large design, the felt and stabilizer are hooped properly.

  • Pulling the fabric:

Yes, this is a big mistake when you are hooping, I see it all the time – and yes, I can tell from a picture that it was not hooped properly, and sometimes I can even tell the mistake.  And this is one of them!  When you are hooping properly, you take the material and the stabilizer and put the hoop together kind of tightly, and when you have everything just so you make the hoop tight so that it will hold everything together. Before you tighten the hoop, you can make some small adjustments, depending on the type of material that you are using and gently pull the fabric into place. What if the material isn’t quite in the right place?  What do you do?  Some people think it is ok to pull on the fabric (and stretch it)  to get it into the right position.  While it may be ok to flatten or pull slightly before you tighten the hoop, anything more than that will cause you so many issues!  Think about it, when you pull the fabric that is already hooped, you are basically stretching the fabric.  When you are finished embroidering, and remove the hoop, what is going to happen?  The fabric does not have anything holding it in the stretched position, so it is going to go back to its normal position, and that will cause some nasty puckering.  It is better to hoop again until you get it right, without stretching the fabric.  Keep hooping it until you get it right.  There really is no point embroidering anything if it doesn’t look great when you are done, right?  RIGHT?  Take your time, hoop properly and carefully.

  • Not hooping fabric because you are worried about Hoop burn:

Hoop burn is no excuse for not hooping something properly. Yes, hoop burn happens!  It really is not a big deal, and is easily fixed, and hoop burn will happen less and less the better you are at your hooping skills.  We have also talked about this one, all you need is a little bit of steam.  If you have hoop burn, have some tea – but before you make the tea, use a little bit of steam on your item to solve that hoop burn.  It is literally fixed in 5 minutes.  So don’t let hoop burn ruin your embroidery, learn to hoop properly and fix it quickly with a little bit of steam if you need to.

  • Not using the right stabilizer:

You need to use the right stabilizer for the embroidery and for the fabric that you are using.  Hatch takes the guesswork out of what stabilizer you should use for certain embroidery.  There are many types of stabilizer, but they fall into two categories:  cutaway and tearaway.    Cutaway offers more stability – it is thicker and more stable and you must use scissors to cut it away.  Tearaway is exactly how it sounds- you can tear it away instead of cutting it.  Obviously tear away is much thinner and less stable than cutaway.  There are also fusible stabilizers, water-soluble stabilizers, no show mesh stabilizers, and the list goes on and on.  What happens if you don’t use the right stabilizer?  Your embroidery will not look ok.  Again, if for some strange reason you are OK with just OK, then keep using water soluble stabilizers for the back of towels…or forget using stabilizers and have none.  Yes, your embroidery *may*look ok when you are done, and it may be ok, but it sure isn’t great.  A lot of people can take their OK embroidery off their machine and gift it or give it to a customer or a friend.  Hooah, you did your first or 100thembroidery.  What is going to happen when they wash it?  If you have no stabilizer, there is nothing to keep the stitches from moving around or clumping up and looking terrible.  People don’t think of this part when they are done with their embroidery.  Embroidery is meant to last through washings and regular use – but only if you stabilize it properly.  Otherwise, the first time they wash your work, they will never use it again, and they will never come back to you again.  Seriously.  That is how it works.

If you take a tea-towel and do one design with a WSS (water soluble stabilizer) and one with a cut away stabilizer, stitch them out and look at them.  OK, the cutaway is going to look sharper, be in registration and look GREAT.  The other one is probably OK.  Now wash them both.  Now, look at them side by side.  If you don’t believe me, try it for yourself.  The properly hooped and stabilized embroidery will still look great, and the other one, well, not so much.  I have seen people actually state that they will NOT use stabilizer on the back of anything because it doesn’t look nice with the stabilizer showing.  Well, that may be the case, but that is how it is done!  If you tidy up the stabilizer, it doesn’t look bad at all, but put your focus on the FRONT where the embroidery is – and when you ask your friend 6 months later “how is the personalized towel I made for you” the answer will be “it is still beautiful” if you use the right stabilizer for the job.  After all, you do embroidery so it will last right? You do embroidery for kids so they can enjoy it, right?  You do embroidery for customers so that they will keep coming back, right?  If you do embroidery that only lasts through a wash or two, do you really think they will be coming back?  No.  No, they wont.  I have a shirt that I embroidered about 10 years ago (it’s my favorite shirt) and I have washed it literally hundreds of times.  And it still looks great and I still get compliments on it.  Don’t you want that effect on your customers and friends?

My advice:  Learn hooping skills and stop taking short cuts.  You are only hurting yourself when you decide that hooping is too difficult to learn, so why bother?  This works fine.  The key word being FINE.  I don’t want just fine, I want long lasting beautiful embroidery that I can be proud of.  Oh, I know some of you are saying, “well, none of my customers/friends/kids have complained about it”  and that might be correct, however, they may not complain, but they will go elsewhere. Guaranteed.

Here is a quick video that shows you some of the basic hooping skills.  Even if you have been doing embroidery for a while, this video is going to give you a few pointers on how to hoop properly.  Learn it, and learn it well.  Once you start hooping correctly, your embroidery will change and look better.

Next week’s blog, we are going to talk about placement.  Once you get basic hooping done properly, we have to put that together with placement and how to hoop properly the first time so that your embroidery design is centered and is in the exact place that you want it, on any fabric.

Until next time, hoop properly and Happy Stitching!

Sue Brown

OML Embroidery

DON’T FORGET TO SUBSCRIBE TO THE OML EMBROIDERY YOUTUBE CHANNEL and LIKE and SHARE videos!!!

Machine Embroidery on an iPad? YES PLEASE!

Get ready for a Wilcom Tutorial that will change how you see embroidery designs – literally!! In this video, I am going to show you how to view, resize and convert embroidery designs right on your iPad or Android device. Don’t believe me? Check out the video! Do you need to convert a PES file to a commercial DST stitch file on the fly? Grab your iPad and convert it! IT’S A FREE EMBROIDERY SOFTWARE FROM WILCOM: Do you want to view your machine embroidery designs on your iPad? How about resizing, mirroring and converting your machine embroidery designs. Add in printing out an embroidery template with all of the embroidery design’s information and you have your answer: WILCOM TRUESIZER WEB EDITION! In this OML video, I am going to show you exactly how awesome Wilcom’s embroidery program is, and exactly how to use this program. Remember that this embroidery program is NOT digitizing software – you are not going to be able to create an embroidery design from the beginning, but you can view, rotate, enlarge and convert embroidery designs on your iPad. Amazing! here is the link: https://www.wilcom.com/ All you have to do is register for an account – don’t worry, it’s easy to do, and then log in and BAM it’s done – you can view your embroidery designs on your iPad!! DID I MENTION THAT IT WAS FREE? Yep, totally free. all you have to do is provide them with your name, address and email address and you are in! It’s really that easy.

HERE IS A VIDEO THAT ANSWERS ALL OF YOUR QUESTIONS ABOUT HOW TO USE AN IPAD FOR EMBROIDERY.

Embroidery on an iPad from Wilcom.com

Take an old hoodie and make it amazing!

Check out this gorgeous sweatshirt that I made using Anita Goodesign Monogram designs!! In this video, I show you how to set up your designs and HOW TO HOOP THE SLEEVES!! This sweatshirt repurposing designs were created in 6 hoopings, including 3 for the sleeves, and ends up with a wow factor for the entire embroidery design, and my old sweatshirt looks amazing! I take you through step by step on how to set up your designs by printing out the templates and making sure they are straight on the sleeve, marking their position and then hooping. Hooping may take some time, but it is worth the time when you see the end result. Even if you don’t have large hoops, you can still do most of this layout with smaller hoops – it will take a few more hoopings to get the front done – I merged a few of the single designs and came up with a symetrical design that looks so pretty! You can position each of the single designs and mark the center and then hoop it as many times as you need to – it will still look great and no one will know how many hoopings you did! If you don’t have a sleeve hoop as I do, you can take apart the sleeve so you can have a flat surface to do the embroidery designs. This is a lot easier and you have more of the sleeve to work on – I could think of many ways to embroider an open sleeve so that it looks great!! I hope you guys like my hoodie and I hope that you will try to repurpose your old sweatshirts too! after all, if you don’t like the design that you create, you can simply toss an old sweatshirt, right?

MACHINE EMBROIDERY EDUCATION. FOR EVERYONE. LEARN. STITCH. SMILE.

IF YOU WANT TO GET EMBRILLIANCE OR UPGRADE EMBRILLIANCE, Please use my affiliate link: https://bit.ly/2SdMvx2 . All $$ will be rolled back into this channel in the form of giveaways, new tools, more tech to make better videos! SUPPORT THIS CHANNEL by subscribing to the channel, liking the video and sharing the video to let us know you want MORE! Turn on notifications so that you won’t miss a video! Lots of cool videos and classes coming up soon and everything is FREE. I have lots of classes and some BIG EMBROIDERY ideas coming up, so make sure you subscribe and support me on this journey together! Don’t worry, everything is free – and embroidery fun, too! No matter what software you use, you can pick up valuable digitizing and embroidery information from any of the videos! Make sure you join our Facebook Group: OML Embroidery University for lots of help on digitizing and embroidery – it is a great group with lots of supportive, helpful people from beginner digitizers and beginner embroiderers to advanced digitizers, commercial digitizers, and embroiderers. There is something for everyone!

you can do this too!!

Learn how to style, set up and hoop different areas of a sweatshirt INCLUDING HOOPING SLEEVES to take your hoodie from meh to WOW with the Victorian Monogram designs by Anita Goodesign! Here is the link to the set: https://www.anitagoodesign.com/product/victorian-monogram/

I’M BAAAACK!

After taking a week off because of medical issues, I am back and jumping in with both feet!

Today’s video is pretty cool – I am trying to cover as much as I can, for each cutter that I have.  I have the newest Cricut Maker, Silhouette Cameo 3 as well as the Brother Scan N Cut DX225 Innovis edition.  If you have one of those cutters, you will be in luck for getting videos!  Ha!

IN this video, I create an SVG in Hatch – there are more than one way to do this – and I am using Corel to help me create it.  Because why not?  Corel is there, might as well use it!

Once I have my nice SVG – remember that it is a SCALABLE vector graphic, so you will be able to resize it – I take it in to each of the 3 different software and make a cut file!

So easy, and your applique will never look the same!!

Enjoy!

WELCOME TO MY VLOG!

I get so busy with sharing everything and answering questions in the OML Embroidery University facebook group, I always forget to blog!!  Today, I remembered!  yay!  I will try to blog more, I have a whole bunch of blogs that are already written that I need to post.

OK, so for today, here is my Vlog.  Hopefully, it will also count as a blog post 🙂

Until next time

Happy Stitching!

 

Sue

#craftsy #craftsy.com #precut #omlembroidery #OML #halloweenfabric

Stabilizer: How important is it?

VERY IMPORTANT.

Knowing what stabilizer to use is very important when you are creating or completing embroidery.  You need to know the correct one, every time.  When I first started doing embroidery and digitizing many years ago,  someone said this to me:

You are only as good as your hooping skills.

That didn’t make a whole lot of sense to me at the time, but it sure does now!   Let me explain this to you in a few ways.  Hooping skills mean being able to hoop the garment or hat properly, but also using the correct tension and the right stabilizer, and adding a topping stabilizer as needed.  You can be an awesome digitizer, but if you can’t hoop properly, you won’t be able to sell too many designs because your “show off” picture won’t look great..  Take that into consideration when you are creating designs or doing test stitch outs – it may not necessarily be the digitizing that is at fault, it is often your hooping skills.

First, let’s take a quick look at the word stabilizer – which is a bit different in embroidery, but has the same meaning:

 

stabilizer in embroidery

definition of “stabilizing” from dictionary.com

“to make or hold stable, firm or steadfast”  That is what the different forms of stabilizer will do – it keeps the material stable for you to embroider.  Have you ever embroidered without stabilizer? This is possible on some fabrics, but otherwise the embroidery won’t look good for very long – it will get wrinkled and terrible looking before long, especially after washing any garment.  So that’s the key – the stabilizer is to make the fabric stable and secure and keep it in place while you embroider.

What happens when you use the wrong stabilizer?  Quite a few things can happen, but let’s look at a few of them.

OUT OF REGISTRATION:  this is a big one, that happens all the time.  If you are stitching a design with a thin single stitch outline, for example, you need to have the fabric stabilized properly, or the outline will be out of registration.    That means that the outline running stitch will not match up with the embroidery – it will be outside where it should be or inside – either way, your embroidery design will not look right.  Some registration issues can come from pull compensation or too many layers, but often it can be because poor stabilization technique.  The solution?  Stabilize it better.  If you are using the thinner tear away stabilizer, switch to the thicker and more solid cut away stabilizer.

CRAPPY LOOKING EMBROIDERY:  I don’t know how to describe this in better words – if your embroidery looks less than sharp, letters are not clear and things don’t look right when you are stitching them out, kind of messy maybe- even though it looks great on the computer -stabilizer is the first thing I change.  Depending on the fabric, you may need to use 2 layers of stabilizer to make the embroidery look good.  Of course, there may be many other contributing factors, but stabilizer is certainly one of them, and it’s also the easiest to try – if it works then you have saved yourself tons of time at the computer trying to figure out some solution!

STITCHES DISAPPEAR:  Yep, this can happen.  Say you are doing to do a simple monogram on a towel, like a bath towel or something of that nature, if you were to use the wrong topper (which is still called stabilizer), the stitches will disappear into the towel, and you will wonder what you are embroidering!  Even though this stabilizer is on the top, it’s still stabilizer – water soluble stabilizer (or WSS for short) sits on the TOP of the towel to provide a good base for the stitches – so you can see them when you have finished  Of course, you must use stabilizer on the bottom too, but either tear away or cut away.  The WSS on the top will hold up the stitches from the nap of the towel, enabling you to have beautiful stitches, even on the thickest of towels.  WSS can be used in a few different ways, but it is necessary for embroidering on towels or anything else with a big nap.  WSS in some form or another is necessary – and the design, any design will look terrible without it.

There are many other examples of what can go wrong if you don’t have your hooping skills up to par!  Learn embroidery, learn to hoop properly to have amazing stitch outs and better embroidery.   Seriously, you can be a better digitizer by keeping up with your hooping skills.

REMEMBER:  YOU ARE ONLY AS GOOD AS YOUR HOOPING SKILLS.   So hoop properly and show off your embroidery!

mother of dachshunds embroidery design

 

Beginner Embroidery

Hey everyone and Happy Friday!  Today’s blog goes out to all the brand new digitizers out there.

Good for you!  Welcome to the embroidery world!  Welcome to learning all about embroidery!  Embroidery is an exciting and creative venue, and I love figuring out new techniques and styles and generally playing with embroidery.

For the new digitizers out there, there are a few things that you must do once you decide that embroidery is what you want to learn about and eventually create.

If you have been embroidering for a while, and know your stitches and understand hooping etc.  this next section will not apply to you.

First:  you need to have an embroidery machine.    Really, you need to have one.   You don’t have to have a $10,000 6 needle machine,  a single needle lower end one will do – you need to be able to stitch out designs and see the stitches, see the mistakes and understand a few things, and I feel strongly that you can only learn all of these things by using an embroidery machine and watching it work.

Second:  RESEARCH AND LEARN.  Yes.  You must learn about embroidery…everything you can about embroidery…how to use your machine, hooping, stabilizers,  bobbins, different threads, different needles, different fabrics,  jump stitches, connections, color changes…the list goes on and on.  You have to learn embroidery – its a skill.  If you think you can pick up digitizing software and instantly you are a digitizer, you are wrong.  It takes so much more than that.  It takes WORK.  It takes LEARNING.  It takes TIME.  It takes RESEARCH….it takes a lot.  The more you put into digitizing, the more you will get out of it with beautiful stitch outs and beautiful designs.

No matter what embroidery software you are using, you must learn about embroidery.  You must understand that you can’t make a satin stitch 3 inches wide…you need to understand stabilizers and good hooping, you must understand all about embroidery before you can learn to digitize.  If you don’t understand embroidery, then you will be frustrated as a digitizer.  SUGGESTION:  watch different designs stitch out…pay attention to what is happening on your machine.  learn about connections…learn to see the difference between a good stitch out and a bad one and most importantly WHY.  Watch designs stitching from different sources – some are better than others.  Hoop…and re-hoop and practice hooping using the correct stabilizers.  You can have the best embroidery design ever, and if you hoop a stretchy material with tear away stabilizer, the design will look terrible.  Remember “you are only as good as your hooping skills” .  You also need to understand what Push/Pull compensation is, and watch it in action on your machine with different stabilizers.  Use your embroidery machine…embroider everything you can and learn to hoop even the most difficult fabrics or items.  How can you create a simple design for a shirt collar and make it fit properly, if you have never embroidered on a shirt collar?

And here are the big ones that I can’t stress enough time and time again:

UNDERSTAND THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A STITCH OR MACHINE FILE AND A FILE THAT YOU CREATED:  .EMB, .EOF, .PXF FILES ARE DIFFERENT FROM STITCH FILES.  THERE IS A BIG DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A STITCH FILE AND A WORKING FILE…BIG…

UNDERSTAND THAT IF YOU TAKE A STITCH FILE AND RENAME IT A .EMB FILE, IT IS STILL NOT A NATIVE .EMB FILE AND YOU STILL DON’T HAVE BIG EDITING CAPABILITIES.

UNDERSTAND THAT YOU CAN’T TAKE A STITCH FILE, BRING IT INTO YOUR DIGITIZING PROGRAM AND EDIT IT VERY MUCH…YOU CAN’T TAKE A STITCH DESIGN THAT IS 2 INCHES AND MAKE IT 7 INCHES.  YOU DON’T HAVE THAT LEVEL OF EDITING.

Understand that these rules apply to ALL DIGITIZING SOFTWARE.   A stitch file that your machine can understand is something completely different from a working file…if you get frustrated and change softwares, those rules still apply.  People ask me this all the time…”I AM SO FRUSTRATED..I HAVE A .PES FILE THAT I BRING INTO STUDIO AND I WANT TO MAKE IT BIGGER AND IT WON’T WORK….I AM SO FRUSTRATED…WILL HATCH/EMBRILLIANCE/WILCOM etc.  DO THIS?  No.  No it won’t.  A STITCH FILE IS MADE FOR STITCHING, A WORKING FILE IS MADE FOR WORKING.  Understand this part, and you will save yourself hours of frustration and wasted materials.   WHAT DOES A WORKING FILE LOOK LIKE? my first answer is “it will look like YOU CREATED IT”   OK, in the software it looks the same as any other file, except that it is completely editable…and the name of it will be different.  Machine files are named depending on the type of machine that you use:  .PES for brother, JEF for Janome, XXX for singer, etc.  The working files will be named differently:  EOF for Embird .EMB for Wilcom, PXF for DG15, etc.  You can’t send a working file to your machine:  your machine will not acknowledge it as anything and it will not stitch.  So again:

STITCH FILES (.PES, JEF, DST etc) are for stitching on your machine, not for working on and editing.

WORKING FILES (EOF, EMB, PXF) are for working on and will not work in any machine.

Once you have mastered embroidery on its own, it may be time to move on to digitizing.  If you understand embroidery, you will better understand digitizing – it will make more sense.   Sure, you can get an embroidery machine and the software that it comes with and dive right in and do everything at the same time, but if you do one step at time you will learn properly and save yourself tons of frustration.   You can’t expect someone in grade 1 to understand something in college, right?  grade 1 is building the foundations for everything you learn in college.  Ok, I am not saying that mastering embroidery is going to take you 12 years, but it is going to take time.  Take the time.  Learn.  Have fun.  Learn some more.  Be happy.

If you have any brand new embroiders/digitizers that you know in your group, etc.  pass this information along to them.  It will be very helpful!!

Wilcom Hatch: Layout features are incredible

At OML we are all about embroidery – and digitizing – and different embroidery software programs that accomplish this. If I could have every embroidery program, I would own all of them!! While I do understand that I am enthusiastic and passionate about digitizing to say the least, I am also always up for new things – especially in embroidery software.  I am not paid by any company to work with their software, I do this all on my own and at my own expense, so I have no loyalty or bias to any digitizing software company.

And of course, before I use or review or even do videos on any software, I work very very hard with it on a daily basis to see what that software can do!  I do many different designs, bring in pictures, complicated designs and typography too  – and put the software to the test!  I do spend lots of time working with the software so I know all of its capabilities and faults.  I am here to highlight my findings on the best parts of the software – I am testing and working with them out so you don’t have to!

Enter Wilcom Hatch.

Wilcom Hatch is a brand new embroidery software program that has been released just this year. Don’t make the mistake that its super expensive and out of your range:  it is not the same as the Wilcom E3 program that has huge functionality at a professional level, and also the professional level price tag, but it has all the power of Wilcom in a simple to use program for every day digitizers and embroidery. Now don’t get me wrong, I am not saying that Hatch is a “simple” embroidery program – Wilcom Hatch is very powerful and can accomplish just about any task! The “simple” in the above sentence means that it is very user friendly and very easy to use.

I can’t really hide my enthusiasm with this software – I think Wilcom has come up with a program that is going to change embroidery digitizing for everyone. Hatch has it all there, right in front of you – and at a price you can afford (personally I would love to have Wilcom E3 as well). That being said, here is one of the most amazing embroidery features that I have seen in a long time.

Wilcom Hatch: Layout Module.

You have to check out the video to really understand what the Layout Module can do. Its super easy and puts the fun back into embroidery. You won’t believe what you can do with this software – this is only one feature! In Layout, you can mirror copy Horizontal, mirror copy vertical, mirror-copy both and of course the amazing and super fun circle layout!! These are just words, you need to see it in action. Its a game changer.

Take 5 minutes to see what layout can do for you:

 

Not enough time in the day for Embroidery

Lots of people say that there is not enough time in the day for embroidery!  I fall into that category as well, there just doesn’t seem to be enough hours in the day!  I have 10 million projects that I want to do, and I have ideas in my head that I need to do!  So many ideas, so little time.  On the bright side in my life, I do get to do embroidery all day – we create and embroider patches, so my day is filled with embroidery!  And I absolutely love it!  Some days, I really just want to sit and digitize all day.  I “work watch” movies and TV and listen to music while I digitize,  and I do find it relaxing as long as there are no time frames for my work to be completed.

So how do you fit in time for embroidery every day?  Here are a few ideas to make a bit of time to add in some embroidery time:

LEARN SOMETHING NEW EVERY DAY.   A little learning each day adds up in the end.  I do this every day – whether I learn something new about the program, a new way of doing things, a new process or using a new thread or style properly.  Something little each day adds up to good working knowledge in the end.

SET SOME QUIET TIME:  I know this is hard for everyone, including me, but I try and set a few minutes each day for some quiet time to give my brain a rest.  During this quiet time, I usually turn to embroidery digitizing.  Start off small  with even 20 minutes and work up from there.   You may not be able to finish a whole design, but you can at least work on it.

LEARNING IS IMPORTANT:  to make good use of your time and learn your embroidery program – if you get a feel for what you are doing then you will have much less frustration in general working with embroidery.  I do suggest that people know the program before they start working on a project.

KNOW YOUR PROGRAM:  no matter what software you are using, get to know the program as much as possible before starting a project.  I get a good feel for a new embroidery program, and then take a learn- as-I-go approach to it.  I know most of the tools, and if i want to do something and I can’t figure it out, instead of trying a whole bunch of things I will always look it up on the Help guide and find the right way the first time.  This saves a ton of frustration and makes learning happy.

SET GOALS:  I set personal goals for myself every day – the things that I want to accomplish in the day – and that always includes a bit of learning time – whether on Embird, Tajima DG15 Photoshop or any other program that I use.  They don’t have to be huge goals, but something simple and workable.  If you don’t have enough time to finish a whole project, set the goal to get one part of it done, and the next day another part until your design is finished.

So remember, you are never too old to learn something new!  Go for it – set yourself out a bit of time each day and start tackling that embroidery to-do list and feel accomplished.

HAPPY DIGITIZING!

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